What Frog is This? Frog Identification Chart

If you just found a frog and are wondering what kind of species it is, you are in the right place!

This page contains detailed tables with frogs you can find in your back yard, garden, local park, swamp, pond or pet store depending on your location (USA, Canada, Australia, Europe).

Start with your location and then have a look at the relevant table below to know which frog you found. Click on the image where you heard or saw the frog and click on the name to see a photo and learn more.

See our toad identification chart for toad species near you

Understanding How to Use The Tables

In order to use the above table optimally start by looking for your location, meaning where you heard or saw the frog or toad you would like to learn about. 

If you cannot see the frog or toad, click on the profiles in your location to hear what the frog or toad sounds like and compare it with what you hear to know which species it is.

Scroll below this table to learn the differences between toads and frogs

  • Common Name: This is the common, non-scientific name typically used by the general population. Click on the photo of the frog to see other names including their scientific name.

  • Pattern: What pattern can you see on the frog’s back? Molted means that the frog is marked with spots or smears of color. Solid means the frog is mainly one color. Spotted means it has spots, and striped means you can see stripes on the frog’s back or legs.

  • Body Color: Have a look at the frog’s body and consider the main color as an indicator, but keep in mind that the color of a frog may vary based on a number of factors.

  • General Size: Some adult frogs are very small, like the size of your finger tip to a finger’s length. Some are medium-sized and can fit in the palm of your hand. However, some frogs can grow to be the size of a small cat! Use this indicator to consider the average size of an adult.

  • Characteristics: This information can help you differentiate the frog from other species.

Ready to dive in? First, start by finding your location. We have frog identification charts for those located in the USA, Canada, Australia, and in Europe below.

USA & Canada Frog Identification Chart

Below you will find profiles of different frog species you can find in North America including Canada and the United States.

You may also want to check out these articles on our blog if you are located in one of these States or Provinces:

Click on the image if there is one to learn more about the species:

Frog Identification Chart Australia

Australia
Perth
Rainforest

Common NamePatternBodySizeCharacteristics
Australasian TreefrogStripedBrown
Tan
Russet
SmallPredominantly brown with tan stripesPadded toes for climbing.
Green and Golden Bell FrogStripedGreen
Brown
SmallPredominantly green with brown stripes.Padded toes for climbing.Mostly lives on the ground.
Growling Grass FrogSolidGreen
Brown
Gold
MediumPredominantly green with gold and brown spots.Bumpy skin.
Barred FrogSolidBrownMediumBlack lines through eyes.Can be found in wet forests.
Australian Green Tree FrogSolidGreenSmallPadded toes for climbing.Can be found in trees in Australia.
Northern Corroboree FrogStriped
Spotted
Black
Yellow
SmallBlack frog with yellow stripes.Secretes its own poison.
Green-Thighed FrogSolidBrown
Black
SmallPredominantly brown with black line through eye.Padded toes for climbing.Mostly lives on the ground.
Giant Barred FrogStripedBrown
Olive
Gold
LargeLarge frog with spotted back and striped legs.

Europe Frog Identification Chart

Common NamePatternBodyBellySizeCharacteristics
European Tree FrogSolidGreen
Dark Brown
Rust
TanSmallPredominantly green.Black / Dark Brown line through eye to belly.
Holarctic Tree FrogsSolidGreen
Mustard
MustardSmallMore green dominance than a European Tree Frog.
Pool FrogSpotted
Striped
Green
Brown
Black
TanMediumPredominantly green and spotted brown.Lines down back.Often found in ponds.
Perez’s FrogSpotted
Striped
Dark Green
Brown
Black
Tan
Spotted
MediumPredominantly dark green.Striped / spotted legs and belly.Lines down back (brown and / or green)
Mediterranean Tree FrogSolidGreen
Lime
Brown
TanSmallPredominantly green and lime.Dark line through eyes from cheek to snout.Padded toes for climbing.
Common FrogSpottedBrown
Tan
White
Tan
SmallMay have spots or stripes.

Do You See a Frog or a Toad?

You may be wondering if the amphibian you see is a frog or a toad.

There are easy ways to differentiate between the two:

As a general rule, toads live on land, have warty skin with poisonous glands behind their eyes, and only return to water duing mating season to lay eggs in strings. Whereas frogs have smooth skin, long legs with webbed feet, live near water, and lay eggs in clusters.

Learn more about the differences between frogs and toads on our blog

Common Questions About Frog Identification

What Types of Frogs Can You Find in the USA? You can find a variety of frogs in the United States including Common Frogs, American Bullfrogs, Spring Peepers, Wood Frogs, Northern Leopard Frogs, Green Frogs, and Mink Frogs.

What Types of Frogs Can You Find in New Jersey? In New Jersey, you can find Common Frogs, Gray Treefrogs, New Jersey Chorus Frogs, Wood Frogs, American Bullfrogs, Mink Frogs, Northern Leopard Frogs, and Green Tree Frogs in their natural habitat or even in your backyard.

What Types of Frogs Can You Find in Ohio? In Ohio, you can find Spring Peepers, Wood Frogs, Common Frogs, American Bullfrogs, Mink Frogs Northern Leopard Frogs, and Green Frogs in their natural habitat and even in your backyard.

What Kinds of Frogs Can You Find in Canada? In Canada, you can find Spring Peepers, Wood Frogs, Tailed Frogs, Common Frogs, American Bullfrogs, Mink Frogs Northern Leopard Frogs, Red-Legged Frogs, Oregon Spotted Frogs, Columbia Spotted Frogs, Pacific Treefrogs, and Green Frogs in their natural habitat and even in your backyard.

What Kinds of Frogs Can You Find in Alberta? In Alberta, you can find Columbia Spotted Frogs, Spring Peepers, Wood Frogs, Boreal Chorus Frogs, and Northern Leopard Frogs in their natural habitat or even in your backyard.

What Kinds of Frogs Can You Find in Ontario? In Ontario, you can find Striped and Boreal Chorus Frogs, Gray Treefrogs, Spring Peepers, Wood Frogs, Pickerel Frogs, Common Frogs, American Bullfrogs, Mink Frogs, and Northern Leopard Frogs in their natural habitat and even in your backyard.

What Types of Frogs Can You Find in Australia? In Australia, you can find Australian Green Treefrogs, Barred Frogs, Person’s Treefrogs, Red-Eyed Tree Frog, Corroboree Frogs, Bleating Froglet, and Golden Bell Frogs in their natural habitat and even in your backyard.

What Types of Frogs Can You Find in Perth? In Perth, you can find Carpenter Frogs, Cave Frogs, Centralian Burrowing Frog, Rocket Frogs, Rock Frogs, Chirping Frogs, Hooting Frogs, Green Treefrogs, and Waterholding Frogs in their natural habitat and even in your backyard.

What Kinds of Frogs Can You Find in Your Backyard? What kinds of frogs you can find in your backyard depends on your location, but in Ontario, you could find Spring Peepers, in Florida, you could find bullfrogs, in Queensland you could find Striped Rocket Frogs, and in the UK you could find Common Frogs.

What Types of Frogs Can You Find in The Rainforest? Types of frogs you can find in the rainforest include colorful Poison Dart Frogs, Emerald Glass frogs, Horned Frogs, Red Eye Tree Frogs, Smokey Jungle Frogs, Waterfall Frogs, and Tomato Frogs.

What Types of Frogs Can You Have as Pets? Types of frogs that are commonly kept as pets include Australian Green Tree Frogs, South American Horned Frogs, African Dwarf Frogs, Poison Dart Frogs, American Green Tree Frogs, African Bullfrogs, and Tomato Frogs.

What Kind of Frog is This? If there is a frog in front of you, it probably does not have warts (otherwise it is a toad). To determine what kind of frog it is use our table and have a look at the pattern on its back, the color, shape, size, and defining characteristics. 

How Do You Identify a Frog? You can identify a frog using our table based on the pattern on its back, the color of its skin and belly, its shape, size, and defining characteristics. 

What Kinds of Frogs Can You Find in Wisconson? In Wisconson, you can find American Bullfrogs, Common Frogs, Spring Peepers, Wood Frogs, Green Frogs,  Mink Frogs, and Northern Leopard Frogs in their natural habitat and even in your backyard.

What Kinds of Frogs Can You Find in Maine? In Maine, you can find Spring Peepers, Wood Frogs, Common Frogs, American Bullfrogs, Mink Frogs Northern Leopard Frogs, and Green Frogs in their natural habitat and even in your backyard.

What Kinds of Frogs Can You Find in Texas? In Texas, you can find American Green Tree Frogs, Common Frogs, American Bullfrogs, Spring Peepers, Wood Frogs, Southern Leopard Frogs, and Rio Grande Chirping Frogs in their natural habitat or even in your backyard.

What Kinds of Frogs Can You Find in Michigan? In Michigan, you can find Common Frogs, American Bullfrogs, Spring Peepers, Wood Frogs, Northern Leopard Frogs, Green Frogs, and Mink Frogs in their natural habitat or even in your backyard.

What Kinds of Frogs Can You Find in Newfoundland? In Newfoundland, you can find Striped and Gray Treefrogs, Spring Peepers, Wood Frogs, Common Frogs, American Bullfrogs, Mink Frogs, and Northern Leopard Frogs in their natural habitat and even in your backyard.

What Kinds of Frogs Can You Find in Quebec? In Quebec, you can find Gray Treefrogs (Rainette Versicolore), Spring Peepers (Rainette Crucifère), Wood Frogs (Grenouille des Bois), Pickerel Frogs, American Bullfrogs (Ouaouaron), Mink Frogs, and Northern Leopard Frogs in their natural habitat and even in your backyard.

Sources

Naturewatch.ca

Museum.Wa.Gov

For sources for each frog profile, click on the profile link in the tables above for more

Note: We created these tables to the best of our knowledge and research, but if you think something is incorrect, please reach out to us and we will look into it. Thanks for helping make this resource even better!