What Toad is This? Toad Identification Chart

Did you just spot or hear a toad? If you are wondering what kind of species it is, you are in the right place!

This page contains a toad identification chart with a list of toads you can find in your backyard, window well, garden, local park, swamp, marsh. Start by looking for the continent where you heard or saw the frog and click on the name to see a photo and learn more.

Not sure if it is a toad or a frog? Scroll down below the table of contents to decipher whether you have a toad or a frog in front of you. If it actually is a frog, check out our frog identification chart here.

Toad Identification Chart

Common NameLocationPatternBodyBellySizeCharacteristics
American ToadN. AmericaMottled
Spotted
Brown
Russet
Dark Olive
CreamMediumLine down back starting between eyes. Warty with poison glands behind eyes.
Canadian ToadN. AmericaMottled
Spotted
Dark Brown
Russet
CreamMediumDarker than American Toad. Line down back starting between eyes.Warty with poison glands behind eyes.
Cane ToadN. America (South)
S. America
Australia
MottledBrown
Olive
Russet
Dijon
BrownLargeWorld’s largest toad in size and weight. Bony ridge from behind eyes to nose tip. Large poison glands behind eyes.
Great Plains ToadN. America (West)Mottled
Spotted
Olive
Russet
Tan
TanMediumPlump and stubby toad. Short snout and very round body.
Colorado River ToadN. America (West)Mottled
Spotted
Brown
Gold
Teal
TanLargeLarge toad with very distinct ridged nose. Ridged eye outline. Generally brown with hints of gold and teal.
Common ToadEurope
Asia
Africa (North)
MottledBrown
Russet
TanMediumWebbed hind feet. Two large poison glands behind eyes.

Note: We created this table to the best of our knowledge and research, but if you think something is incorrect, please reach out to us and we will look into it. Thanks for helping make this resource even better!

Understanding How to Use The Above Table

In order to use the above table optimally start by looking for your location, meaning where you heard or saw the frog or toad you would like to learn about. 

If you cannot see the frog or toad, click on the profiles in your location to hear what the frog or toad sounds like and compare it with what you hear to know which species it is. Scroll below this table to learn the differences between toads and frogs.

Common NameThis is the non-scientific name used to label the frog or toad in question. Click on their profile to see other names including their scientific name.
LocationThis is where you saw the frog or toad in question. They may be in the same location as you, but this may not be their origin. Click on their profile to see where the frog or toad actually comes from.
PatternWhat pattern can you see on the frog’s back? Molted means that the frog is marked with spots or smears of color. Solid means the frog is one color only on its back. Spotted means it has spots and striped means you can see stripes on the frog’s back.
Body ColorIf you can see the toad or frog, what color is its body? Try to consider the overall color as an indicator since some frogs and toads of the same species can vary in color.
Belly Color If you can see the toad or frog, what color is its belly? Try to consider the overall color as an indicator since some frogs and toads of the same species can vary in color.
General SizeSome adult frogs remain small, some are medium-sized and some can grow to be the size of a small dog! Use this indicator to consider the average size of an adult. If you cannot see the frog, skip this column.
CharacteristicsThis information can help you differentiate the frog from other species.

Do You See a Toad or a Frog?

You may be wondering if the amphibian you see is a toad or a frog (CTNF). There are easy ways to differentiate between the two:

As a general rule, frogs have smooth skin, long legs with webbed feet, live near water, and lay eggs in clusters. Whereas toads live on land, have warty skin with poisonous glands behind their eyes, and only return to water during mating season to lay eggs in strings.

Learn more about the differences between frogs and toads in this article on our blog.

More About Toads

This site is all about toads and frogs so be sure to check out our other toad resources below to learn more about these amazing creatures:

Common Questions About Toads

What Kinds of Toads Can You Find in Your Backyard? The kinds of toads you can find in your backyard depending on your location, but in Ontario, you could find American Toads, in Florida and Queensland you could find Cane Toads and in the UK you could find Common Toads.

What Kinds of Toads Can You Find in the USA? You can find American Toads in the United States, you may spot Canadian Toads in Mane or Vermont, and you can find Cane Toads in Florida and Texas. Colorado River Toads and Great Planes Toads can be found in the Western States.

What Kinds of Toads Can You Find in Canada? You can find American and Canadian Toads in Eastern Canada in the Maritimes, Quebec, and Ontario, as well as Great Planes Toads in Western Canada in southern Alberta and Saskatchewan.

What Kinds of Toads Can You Find in Alberta? You can find Western Toads, Canadian Toads, Great Planes Toads, and Planes Spadefoot Toads in Alberta Canada.

What Kinds of Toads Can You Find in Ontario? You can find American Toads and Fowler’s Toads in Ontario.

How Do You Identify Toads? You can identify a frog or toad using our table based on the pattern on its back, the color of its skin and belly, its shape, size, and defining characteristics.

Where Do Toads Live? Toads generally live on land and thrive in suburban areas with backyards and bodies of water close by where they can mate in the Spring.